Zenger Folkman Leadership Podcast Get answers to today’s toughest leadership and development problems from thought leaders Jack Zenger and Joe Folkman!

May 26, 2010  

Jack Zenger answers the following questions in this episode:

  • What have you found to be the best way to get the C-Suite's to pay attention to the issue of Inspiring Leadership? Most of the time they glaze over - they don't seem to get the power of human/leader growth and how it relates to key business outcomes.

  • Does any of your research address the tool of "faking it until you make it"? Meaning should a leader pretend to be enthusiastic, emotionally connected, and people focused or does that always translate as being transparent?

  • In the 6 approaches to emotional connection, were there any common combinations? Were some approaches used by leaders more frequently than others? If one of the approaches to emotional connection is a weakness for you, but you try to use it, does it become a detractor to your leadership effectiveness?

  • What is the best way to learn to be an inspiring leader?

  • If the employee knows the leader more closely, does that affect the leader’s effectiveness and ability to inspire?

  • How does one get emotionally connected to a direct report when there might be HR concerns involved?

  • With more and more companies leaning to a remote workforce (i.e. employees in home based office enviornments) - do you have any advice for leadership in this type of working model?

  • Do you think that generations have different Passions for Leadership? How do we take that into consideration with the younger X and Y generations coming into the workplace?

  • In my experience, business structures are managed quite top-down. Many leaders do not see any "need" to connect to their employees, even if it affects the business outcome. Having and using power seems to be a benefit by itself. What is your impression about that?

We’d love for you to experience our award-winning leadership workshops in a city near you.  We also invite you to join us for our monthly webinars. To learn more, visit zengerfolkman.com/events.

To listen to past podcast episodes and view the notes for this episode, visit zengerfolkman.com/podcast. There you can also enter our monthly book contest.

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May 4, 2010  

Jack Zenger and Joe Folkman answer the following questions in this episode:

 

  • I’ve been at my organization for six years and I’d like to move from my department to a one that interests me more. Do you have any suggestions on how to go about that?

  • As a manager, where should I draw the line between providing rewards and incentives for employees and telling them they should just get their jobs done because that’s what they’re here for?

  • When you manage in the trenches daily as a VP and Executive management preaches leadership and training and mentoring, why does it seem to escape them? It is easy for them to talk about, but all of us are in the trenches wondering why it doesn’t apply to senior management.

  • I believe that working on strengths is vital to a leader’s ability to improve, but often times “Work on your strengths, not your weaknesses,” is thrown around as an end-all-fix-all. Are there certain follow-up activities that I can perform to ensure that my leaders and those I manage are actually working on strengths? In addition, what can I do after the training is over to renew their fire for wanting to develop their strengths and hopefully avoid the drop-off in development that comes a few days after they sit through that class?

  • If management is coaching me, who coaches management? Is there a best practice to help someone like me who is in middle management act as an informal coaching role with my direct manager?

  • My company is in quite a financial pinch, as I imagine most are right now. What would you say are some of the things my company can do development-wise to continue developing our employees without having to spend large amounts of money?

  • Our organization has a lot of turnover in upper management. Every few years one of our major departments gets a new head or some C-level executive changes positions or leaves for another job at another company. Every time this happens it seems we have to rediscover how our current culture will fit in with the style each new manager. What can we do to stabilize our organization, regardless of who is leading us?

We’d love for you to experience our award-winning leadership workshops in a city near you.  We also invite you to join us for our monthly webinars. To learn more, visit zengerfolkman.com/events.

To listen to past podcast episodes and view the notes for this episode, visit zengerfolkman.com/podcast. There you can also enter our monthly book contest.

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